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Tag Archives: 3D

Sony’s new 3mm lenticular sheet allows 3D viewing without glasses.

Sony Corp will release a sheet that enables a notebook PC to display 3D images that can be viewed with the naked eye without using special glasses in Europe.

The newly-developed sheet that realizes 3D images viewable with the naked eye

The company exhibited it at IFA 2011, the largest consumer electronics trade show in Europe, which runs from Sept 2, 2011, in Berlin, Germany. The sheet was developed for the “Vaio VPCSE1Z9E (S series),” a notebook PC that is equipped with a 15.5-inch color LCD panel and will be launched in Europe in October 2011. And it will be commercialized at the same time as the release of the notebook PC.

The sheet attached to a notebook PC. The face recognition function is seen at the upper left corner of the screen.

The size of the sheet is almost the same as that of a 15.5-inch LCD panel, and its thickness is about 3mm. It is attached to the front side of the notebook PC’s LCD panel. The naked-eye 3D display is realized based on the lenticular method, which creates parallax by arraying lenses that are thin and long and have a semicircular cross section.

The sheet will come with a dedicated application software that uses the Web camera of the notebook PC to determine the position of the user’s face and adjusts 3D images so that the user can see optimal 3D images at the position.

A human face can be detected when it is located at a distance of 30cm to 1m from the display and at an angle of 60 to 120° to the display horizontally. And, in consideration of the height of the face, the application optimizes 3D images. The sheet is priced at 129 euro (approx US$183)…visit source article.

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AMD Releases Quad Buffer SDK for AMD HD3D technology to Accelerate the Development of Stereo 3D.

August 17, 2011 —

SUNNYVALE, CA — (Marketwire) — 08/18/11 — AMD (NYSE: AMD) today announced the availability of the AMD Quad Buffer SDK for AMD HD3D technology, delivering a vital tool to developers engaged in building immersive stereo 3D capabilities into upcoming game titles. Concurrently, new passive and active monitors from Acer, LG, Samsung, and Viewsonic have further expanded ecosystem support for AMD HD3D technology. End-users with systems including any of the following: the AMD A-Series APUs, AMD Radeon™ HD 5000 or HD 6000 HD3D-capable graphics products now have even more choice thanks to the Open Stereo 3D initiative in building their stereo 3D gaming or Blu-ray 3D playback system.

“AMD HD3D technology has reached critical mass, with more games, more movies, and supporting hardware and software from many of the industry’s leading vendors,” stated Matt Skynner, corporate vice president and general manager, AMD Graphics Division. “The addition of the Quad Buffer SDK can help our many developer partners make stereo 3D a standard part of future game titles.”

AMD Quad Buffer SDK

A big part of enabling stereo 3D support is the ability of AMD graphics hardware to drive four frame buffers simultaneously. AMD Quad Buffer SDK, available on AMD Developer Central, is designed to enable game and application developers to accelerate development time of stereo 3D within their titles. The SDK provides clear guidelines on how to implement stereo 3D to help ensure that it can be enjoyed across the expanding ecosystem of monitors and stereo 3D glasses supporting AMD HD3D technology. Additionally, the quad buffer can be used to add native support for stereo 3D in video games and supports DirectX® 9, 10 and 11.

Monitors & 3D Glasses
Computer monitors supporting AMD HD3D technology are now shipping from several major vendors, including Acer, LG, Samsung, and Viewsonic. The approach to stereo 3D varies from monitor to monitor, but they all have in common the ability to enable an incredibly immersive stereo 3D experience.  continue reading.

Sony Unveils HD Recording Digital Binoculars With 2D & 3D Capture

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New Sony HD-recording Digital Binoculars models, DEV-3 and DEV-5, have been announced. The new models, the “World’s First Digital Binoculars With HD Video Recording, Zoom, Autofocus and SteadyShot Image Stabilization”, allow users to capture “can’t miss” moments in 1080 AVCHD 2.0 video, 3D, 7.1 MP images, and full stereo sound. According to Sony Electronics:

“Now consumers can watch birds, wildlife, sports action and more in steady, sharply-focused close-up views, while capturing their subjects in crisp Full HD. These new models add entirely new levels of flexibility and convenience to viewing, recording and enjoying your favorite images and scenes.”

The binoculars feature an ergonomic grip, a “stealh” design, a rechargeable battery pack good for about three hours of 2D recording, and a GPS receiver which allows for automatic geo-tagging of pictures (DEV-5 model only). Both models electronically autofocus at any magnification (in 2D) and the DEV-3 and DEV-5 have 10x and 20x optical zoom respectively. The new binoculars will be available for purchase for $1400 and $2000 this coming November.

What do you think of Sony’s HD Binoculars? Pretty, neat, right? Maybe we will see some higher-quality fan footage from sporting events this Christmas…visit original post.

THE LION KING 3D Conversion Images Show Off Depth of Field.

Original article by Bill Graham    Posted:August 9th, 2011 at 6:38 pm

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Disney’s The Lion King will release into theaters this year in a new 3D format for the very first time on September 16th. The film was a childhood favorite of mine, and every time I hear “The Circle of Life,” I get goosebumps. Needless to say, I look forward to viewing the film on the big screen, something I may have done when I was little but can’t recall. However, I do wonder how a film from the ’90s will hold up, animation wise, and how a 3D conversion of it will fare on the big screen.

Today, Disney sent over some images showing just what the conversion process entails, including adding notes of depth and then using filters to key in on what will be in the foreground, background, and everywhere in between. The process is a lot more difficult than this, but it gives us a great idea of what the process entails on a basic, easy to understand level. Hit the jump to view those images, including a description of what we are looking at, a discussion with the stereographer Robert Neuman about the procedure itself, and my impressions of the scenes they showed before Cars 2.

First, let’s get to the good stuff. Disney sent over two scenes that show off the process. The first is of Pride Rock and the second is of Scar. The basic process is taking a finished image, adding a layer and marking depth details, and then using a layering system to key on those depth markings in the image to tell the computer where to place the image. Here are those images [click to enlarge]:

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Here are the captions Disney sent over as well, explaining the images in more detail:

1. The original film image.

2. The 3D Depth Map created by Robert Neuman, the 3D Stereographer on the film. Positive numbers refer to the amount of pixels the image will come out of the screen and negative numbers refer to the amount of pixels the image will go deeper into the screen, creating the 3D depth.

3. Grey Scale – The final image in the computer representation of depth. Darker images will be furthest away, and lighter images will be closer to the viewer.”

….click here to continue reading original article.

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